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I Made A Dumb Hockey Tweet

Created 1 years 107 days ago
by Michael DeNicola

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written by Michael DeNicola


Thursday, August 25th, 2016 --



I say some silly things sometimes. Okay, let's call them "stupid" things. 


Earlier today, the Arizona Coyotes and the Florida Panthers made a trade...



I follow the breaking news with this naive thought...



Can Andrew MacDonald technically be traded? Yes. Is it possible? Yes. But today's trade has absolutely nothing to do with it, nor does it mean it'd make it just as easy or easier to move Andrew MacDonald's contract. And I'll get into the reasons why.


For starters -- and this is so blatantly obvious that it's a crime I didn't initially think about it -- if the Flyers were to dump MacDonald's contract on someone, then there'd have to be an incentive. Getting a team to the salary cap floor is not enough bait. Much like what Florida did, the Flyers would probably have to pair MacDonald with a prospect.... a good prospect. That is completely out of Ron Hextall's character. So that's nixed before it even draws its first breath. 


Next, Dave Bolland is injured and reports out there say he's not even close to 100%. Why is Arizona trading for a player who probably won't see action next season? Same reasons they assumed the contracts of Pavel Datsyuk and Chris Pronger. It's all related to team spending and inflating their salary cap, which financially are two completely different things. Bolland costs $5.5 million against the cap through 2018-19, and his salary matches that. But God bless loopholes...





Bolland, as long as he's injured and cannot pass a physical, will have most of his salary paid through the insurance that covers his contract. The Coyotes are only liable to pay a fraction in actual cash... as they are with Pronger. They don't owe Datsyuk any actual money since he technically retired from the NHL, but the salary cap obligation remains since it's a 35-Plus contract.


MacDonald? Healthy as a horse and still very much a part of the NHL. And although his $5.0m AAV could help teams reach the cap floor, his actual salary terms are no luxury. This year, Andrew's owed $4.75 million in salary. In 2017-18, his salary is $5.25 million, and $5.5 the year after that. In the final league year of his contract, Andrew MacDonald will walk away with $5.75 million in salary. So he's only going to get more and more expensive as time moves forward.


The only insurance in this scenario is my own.... after I slam my goddamn head off my desk. Needless to say, none of that makes MacDonald easier to move than Dave Bolland. 


While the 'Yotes are busy fielding a very young, very talented, very inexpensive corps of players and prospects, their salary cap stays rich and they actually spend more on office supplies. Arizona's 27-year-old General Manager, John Chayka, is playing one HELL of a game of chess. Some people would say this is circumvention. I don't know too much about that, but I will say Chayka is certainly an astute young man. 



In all likelihood, if Andrew MacDonald does wind up getting traded, it'd probably happen by the trade deadline in 2020 before his contract expires. And we all know the Flyers would likely have to retain a very large percentage. 


If anything happens before then, it's either a miracle or Las Vegas lifts him in the Expansion Draft... which is just as likely to happen as said miracle. 


Today's trade benefited both teams. There was some risk involved on one end, and there was a cost on the other end. But in the grand scheme of things, two teams managed to help one another and it took a very subtle loophole and convenient timing to pull it off. Lastly, none of this should have ever made any reasonable person believe it'd make Andrew MacDonald's situation more flexible.



Steve Harvey TV sorry steve harvey im sorry


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